Is it a bank holiday this weekend in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland?

Is it a bank holiday this weekend in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland?

The end of August means another bank holiday weekend to enjoy, that’s right, hello three day weekend.

However, the summer bank holiday doesn’t apply to everyone in the UK, here’s everything you need to know.

Bank holidays across the UK can differ across the four nations, this is because different bodies in each authority are responsible for allocating them.

Typically, England, Wales and Northern Ireland have similar bank holidays, whereas Scotland tends to be different.

Scotland celebrates St Andrew’s Day which is a bank holiday, whereas the other three nations do not.

In England and Wales, a total of eight bank holidays are given every year, whilst in Scotland, there are nine and in Northern Ireland there are 10.

Seemingly unlucky for England and Wales who celebrate less, but nonetheless enjoy a fair few through the summer months.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland this is the last bank holiday until December, meaning it’s the last bank holiday to enjoy the hopefully, warm weather.

On Monday, August 30, residents across England, Wales and Northern Ireland can enjoy an extra day off work, known as the summer bank holiday.

The next bank holiday after Monday won’t be until after Christmas on December 27 and 28, but we can enjoy these as substitute days as Christmas falls on a Saturday this year.

This is also the case during New Year, New year falls on Saturday resulting in another substitute day on Monday 3 January.

However, this is not the same for residents in Scotland, who will have to wait a little longer for a bank holiday.

Those in Scotland do not have the August bank holiday, but instead on November 30 celebrate St Andrew’s Day.

Scotland residents will also enjoy the same bank holidays in December and January as Christmas and New Year is celebrated.

Why do we have a Summer bank holiday?

This late August bank holiday was first introduced years ago, to give everyone a chance to enjoy the summer, making most of the weather.

Always falling on a Monday, this bank holiday didn’t always fall at the end of the month but instead was allocated at the beginning of August.

This happened until 1971 until it was decided that it was best to move it to the end of the month as it clashed with the traditional two-week shut down that many companies used to do during summer.

Why is it called a bank holiday?

Bank holidays were first introduced by a man called Sir John Lubbock who was in fact a scientific writer, banker, politician and first Baron of Avebury.

In 1871 he drafted the first bank holiday bill, which later created the first official bank holiday.

However, the name did not come from his occupation but instead due to the fact that at first banks and buildings would only close during a bank holiday.

As years went on, more businesses began to close as well as schools and the government.

Today, some businesses stay open during bank holidays, some have limited opening hours and others will continue to close on these days.

Schools and other educational facilities have also continued to be closed on each bank holiday.

The government can introduce new bank holidays if they wish, once it has been officially agreed by the Queen and she can also introduce them herself.

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